What Twitter Sentiment Analysis Says Abut Super Bowl Quarterbacks Eli Manning and Tom Brady

What’s the Twitter sentiment for New York Giants Quarterback Eli Manning and New England Patriots Quarterback Tom Brady?

IBM and the University of Southern California Annenberg School of Journalism did sentiment analysis to determine how people are judging the two before Sunday’s Super Bowl.

According to its analysis of 600,000 tweets, Brady has a 62% positive sentiment with the Twitter community, compared to Manning’s 62%.

Interestingly, though, it’s the wide receivers with the highest positive sentiment. IBM says that’s due to the press attention they have received leading up to the game.

What’s the takeaway?

The Super Bowl is portrayed as the biggest game of the year. But we all know that it’s really the biggest brand event, too. The advertising is followed with as much interest as the game.

But now we enter a different realm. It’s the social angle which gives a brand a certain edge. Active on Twitter? The community will see it. But that’s just one diemnsion. IBM uses Twitter to predict how a film will do. With Annenberg, they helped Dreamworks figure out how Puss N’ Boots would become the top grossing fil for the weekend it debuted.

IBM also uses Twitter for machine learning. It takes Twitter data from people at the airport to predict flight delays. It knows that people tweet about Starbucks every ten seconds and that Lady Ga Ga gains more followers than Twitter adds accounts.

IBM’s analysis shows the power that a social brand plays. The community defines how you are perceived. It really does not matter if you are a quarterback, an account executive or a developer. Your standing in large part depends on the people you interact with.

But it also shows what an opportunity companies have that use Twitter data to find insights. The data can be easily tuned. It’s accessible. It is a clear example of the value that big data brings.

About Alex Williams

Alex Williams is an editor for SiliconAngle and lives a charmed life in Portland, Or.