Workplace Startup LiquidSpace Bags $6M

LiquidSpace pegs itself as a “professional workplace marketplace” acting as a broker that lets travelers rent cubicles and offices in the same manner they would book a hotel room. The startup operates across 50 locations throughout the U.S., and its catalog features 2000 listings that range from sub-$100 workspaces to luxurious offices you’d reserve for meetings with big clients.

LiquidSpace’s business is based on a truly unique concept that managed to attract the attention of travelers, property owners and VCs alike. The company just closed a $6 million Series B funding round led by The GPT Group; an Aussie investment fund that seeks out early stage real-estate firms.  Shasta Ventures, Floodgate Fund and Greylock Capital, whose names you’ll hear a lot more often in Silicon Valley, also participated in the round

“In today’s consumer driven economy, the professional worker, whether freelancer, startup entrepreneur or Fortune 500 employee, is accustomed to freedom of choice in where and how they work,” said Mark Gilbreath, Founder and CEO of LiquidSpace. “By providing these professionals with tools to confidently choose great spaces, we’re helping to accelerate a dramatic transformation in the commercial real estate landscape. We are thrilled to have the support of the GPT Group and look forward to leveraging their insights and market leverage to grow LiquidSpace on a global scale. GPT will be instrumental in the establishment of LiquidSpace in Australia.”

The San Francisco-based startup was founded in 2010 and has grown steadily ever since. The 12-person team has raised $10.9 million in funding to date: this week’s $6 million round plus a $1.3 seed investment it secured in 2010 and another $3.6 it got in 2011. We bumped into LiquidSpace about a year after their launch during SxSW last March, where its founders caught us up on their progress, strategy and thoughts on big data.

About Maria Deutscher

Maria Deutscher is a staff writer for SiliconANGLE covering all things enterprise and fresh. Her work takes her from the bowels of the corporate network up to the great free ranges of the open-source ecosystem and back on a daily basis, with the occasional pit stop in the world of end-users. She is especially passionate about cloud computing and data analytics, although she also has a soft spot for stories that diverge from the beaten track to provide a more unique perspective on the complexities of the industry.