Mix n’ Match Cloud Services = Big Gains for SnapLogic

SnapLogic  says that demand for its API service tripled last year thanks to growing interest from corporate clients such as Bloomin’ Brands and Outback Steakhouse, two of its latest customers.

The San Mateo, Calif-based startup offers an open development environment architected specifically to mix-and-match cloud services and data streams. Users of the SnapLogic Integration Platform get access to a catalog of Snaps, or optimized connectors, that are considerably safer to implement via the solution than doing the process manually.

The SnapStore features over 150 of these data connectors, including the most-widely used ones from SAP, Microsoft, Google and other big name software vendors.

“It’s gratifying to see enterprise CIOs embrace SnapLogic in their new roles as Chief Innovation Officers,” SnapLogic chairman and CEO  Gaurav Dhillon wrote in a statement. “These new CIOs and their teams are successfully orchestrating petabytes of business data seamlessly across hybrid environments by utilizing our powerful, cloud-centric integration technology as the engine that drives their innovation.”

Dhillon expects his company to enter a “new phase of growth” in 2013, but beating last year’s record may prove to be quite a challenge for the executive.

In 2012 SnapLogic made dozens of new partners including software firms and system integrators; it assembled an advisory board comprised of all-star CIOs; and it got three awards from three separate industry organizations. Last but not least, it raised $20 million in September.

The company’s Series C funding round was led by Ignition Partners, which took part alongside existing investors Frank Artale and Andreessen Horowitz. The biggest capital injection in the history of SnapLogic raised the startup’s total funding to $32.5 million, more than enough money to propel a small company forward until it turns a profit.

About Maria Deutscher

Maria Deutscher is a staff writer for SiliconANGLE covering all things enterprise and fresh. Her work takes her from the bowels of the corporate network up to the great free ranges of the open-source ecosystem and back on a daily basis, with the occasional pit stop in the world of end-users. She is especially passionate about cloud computing and data analytics, although she also has a soft spot for stories that diverge from the beaten track to provide a more unique perspective on the complexities of the industry.