HP Launches New StoreVirtual SMB Servers

Hewlett-Packard is targeting small-to-medium businesses with new storage arrays and software that promise to make virtualization and data warehousing easier for a reasonable price tag.

The company extended its StoreVirtual line-up with two new models that run the latest version of its data center platform, LeftHand Operating System 10.  StoreVirtual 4130 and 4330 Storage are both based on ProLiant Gen8 servers and fit snugly into a U1 cabinet, but vary greatly in density. The 3130 packs four 2.5-inch SAS drives, while the 4330 can hold twice as much, with a maximum capacity of 7.2TB.  The latter configuration comes with optimal Fibre Channel connectivity that adds support for both iSCSI and Fibre Channel ports.

The StoreVirtual family has been around for a while, which can’t be said for StoreEasy. The latest addition to the HP Converged Storage portfolio is another SMB product family, designed to store data for apps and file shares.

StoreEasy 1000, 3000, 5000 all run Windows Storage Server 2012 on Gen8, as well as the same controller used in the StoreVirtual boxes. The 1000 is an entry level solution for small businesses packs 8TB of capacity, while the StoreEasy 5000 offers a much broader range of features that appeal to both clients and resellers. HP didn’t disclose hardware specifications for the high-end model, but it says it’s optimized for high availability and includes support for Hyper-V.

StoreVirtual and StoreEasy will launch on December 4 and 10, respectively. LeftHand Operating System 10 will roll out around the same time.

This roll-out follows a similar move by IBM to capture a bigger chunk of the increasingly profitable SMB market. Big Blue unveiled an entry-level version of its Storwize storage virtualization platform that is available for the starting price of $11,000, just a tad lower than the $11,500 low HP set for its third generation StoreVirtual machines.

About Maria Deutscher

Maria Deutscher is a staff writer for SiliconANGLE covering all things enterprise and fresh. Her work takes her from the bowels of the corporate network up to the great free ranges of the open-source ecosystem and back on a daily basis, with the occasional pit stop in the world of end-users. She is especially passionate about cloud computing and data analytics, although she also has a soft spot for stories that diverge from the beaten track to provide a more unique perspective on the complexities of the industry.