Top 20 Most Popular Programming Languages Among Hacker News Readers

Python source code Two weeks ago someone ran a poll on Hacker News asking what the readers’ favorite programming language was. Yesterday (April 5) I took a look back at the poll to see who came out on top.

I wasn’t surprised to see Python win, but I was surprised to see it lead Ruby by over 1,000 votes. C# fared well with 5th place, and Haskell and Clojure rounded out the top 10.

  1. Python (3044)
  2. Ruby (1718)
  3. JavaScript (1412)
  4. C 966
  5. C# 828
  6. PHP 662
  7. Java 551
  8. C++ 529
  9. Haskell 518
  10. Clojure 458
  11. CoffeeScript 361
  12. Objective C 326
  13. Lisp 321
  14. Perl 310
  15. Scala 233
  16. Scheme 190
  17. Other 188
  18. Erlang 162
  19. Lua 145
  20. SQL 101

No other language had over 100 votes, but Groovy was added two hours late, so perhaps if were included to begin with it would be on the list instead of “other.”

Cobol came in dead last with 10 votes.

Compare that with RedMonk’s comparison of programming language usage on GitHub matched to StackOverflow questions:

Polls like this don’t do much to tell us which programming languages are “best” or what languages are most used in production. They’re not even controlled to make sure the people voting are actually programmers, so it’s hard to read too much into them. But they do tell a bit about what languages developers like to use. As developers become entrepreneurs and startups become enterprises, these sort of preferences can have an impact on the job market, so taking a look at these sorts of lists can help developers decide what to learn. And for employers, they can provide a data point for deciding what languages attract developers. Of course the usual caveats apply – use the best tool for the job and use these results as only a single data point weighted against many others to decide what to learn/use.

See also: Our “Evolution of Programming” infograpic.

Photo by Tim Lucas

About Klint Finley

Klint Finley is a Senior Writer at SiliconAngle. His specialties include IT services, enterprise technology and software development. Prior to SiliconAngle he was a writer for ReadWriteWeb. He's also a former IT practicioner, and has written about technology for over a decade. He can be contacted at angle@klintfinley.com.